No kidding.

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This is from Pring’s Photographer’s Miscellany: Stories, Techniques, Tips & Trivia (page… um… 88).

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Dermal Aspects Of Emulsion

“We spend billons on skin care each year and know much about it. Why not consider film the same way?”

http://motion.kodak.com/motion/uploadedFiles/US_plugins_acrobat_en_motion_newsletters_filmEss_12_Storage_and_Handling.pdf

Legacy Gear

 

“Ralph Gibson uses Andreas Feininger’s tray, Abe Frajndlich uses Minor White’s, and John Coplans’ tray is used by Amanda Means. The tradition of darkroom printing carries on, regardless of the arguments surrounding it and its supposed demise.”

http://www.slate.com/blogs/behold/2012/10/22/john_cyr_documents_famous_photographers_developer_trays.html

I inherited an armload of items from Mrs. D.’s uncle, and I have a precious one-of-a-kind film drying…device… from Eileen Weber. On occasion, when donations to the Huge School darkroom arrive, we see fit to bequeath sundry pieces to diehard devotos who’ll give ’em a good home.

Richard Learoyd used a 19th century lens loaned to him from a portrait camera in Thomas Joshua Cooper’s office at the Glasgow School of Art.

http://blakeandrews.blogspot.com/#!/2012/11/camera-as-artifact.html

Garry Winogrand’s Leica. http://www.cameraquest.com/LeicaM4G.htm

Somebody has Joel Peter Witkin’s enlarger. http://www.photoeye.com/auctions/citation.cfm?id=1

John Cyr’s Respect; or, Hand-me-downs

Jock Sturges uses Paul Strand’s contact printing frame; someone now has Joel-Peter Witkin’s enlarger. We have darkroom parts from Mrs. D.’s uncle, and some of you have, or will use, equipment from the homes of BHS alumni.

http://vimeo.com/43289528

http://www.edelmangallery.com/exhibitions/2012/installed/installed.htm

Community Darkrooms in Chicagoland

Good news! This place opened in May. It’s a few feet from the Kennedy, just before downtown, a great location: http://chicagocommunitydarkroom.org/

This  is the only one of the places listed here that I’ve seen: http://www.norris.northwestern.edu/recreation/artica/ It’s in the Norris Center on Northwestern’s campus in Evanston (right below the cafeteria!), and parking is problematic (but I can explicate it for you). For everyone’s benefit and safety, one takes a short quiz the first time, so they know that you know what you’re doing.

These are located in Park District fieldhouses: http://www.chicagoartistsresource.org/visual-arts/node/8398 The practical ones for you to consider are the 2nd and the 4th.

(I came across a nice older apartment building for students near Loyola that features studio space, rehearsal space, and darkroom space, but upon further investigation the word “bedbugs” appeared. ‘Nuff said.) (As well, many of the rehearsals were scheduled in mid-night.)

If you are aware of a darkroom on your campus, especially if your major is not Photography or any sort of art, please let us know about it so we can spread the word. Also, the offer still stands: all the technical information you need in order to set up or restore a campus/dorm darkroom is yours for the asking.

Work in Progess/Process

Not that anyone’s on tenterhooks, but some negatives are made, and what remains is what has been called the “photo-finishing.”

As a further preview, here’s a little sample ‘shopping:

Yep.

You don’t have to abandon the process you enjoy

In response to this week’s alarmist articles about film’s allegedly imminent demise, Blake Andrews posted on his blawwg: “I must live in some film bubble timewarp because virtually every photographer I know in Portland still shoots film. My photogroup Lightleak has eight to twelve members depending on what month it is and who shows up, and every one of us is a film shooter.”

If you have asked about this, or paid attention to conversations and posts, you already know that most of the following is reasonable. Nonetheless, this article by Ctein…

…makes long-term planning clearer: http://theonlinephotographer.typepad.com/the_online_photographer/2011/06/film-photography-future.html