How To Deal With… Green

Today is the feast day of Saint Gertrude of Nivelles, the patron saint of cats (yawn), who lived from 626 to 659 in Belgium. It is also the day of St. Patrick, apropos to which John Gossage has said that he has dealt with how to use green in his photographs. Mr. Gossage says that he has gotten guidance from Corot; here are some of his solutions.

Central Camera

…was featured in a small puff piece for the series “made In Chicago” on WBBM (News Radio 78).

https://wbbm780.radio.com/articles/made-in-chicago-central-camera

Adox Coats Paper With Silver

Lina Bessonova takes us on a tour of the Adox coating plant.

This is how the sausage is made; do not avert your eyes.

“Wrong is right.” -T. Monk

Add fireworks to the list of hopeless, unredeemable cliches, along with barns, sunsets, and cats (sorry, Erica). But soft! Might these be reinvented successfully?

“More Diligence.” Yikes.

This, from the Great Yellow Father:

As many of you know, the United States Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has recently been installing Computed Tomography (CT) scanners for carry-on luggage in US airports. In the coming months these scanners will be operational at 145 airports in the US. CT scanning technology has been used for checked luggage for many years, and Kodak Alaris and Eastman Kodak have warned photographers not to check their film, but rather to carry it on and request it be hand-checked by TSA agents at Security.

To better assess the risk to film from the new carry on scanners we brought a small quantity of Portra 400/135 to John F Kennedy Airport in NYC. With the help of TSA representatives the film was put through the new carry on CT scanners from 1-10 times. The film was then evaluated at Eastman Kodak Research facilities. The initial results are not good. Just 1 scan shows significant film fogging, leading to smoky blacks and loss of shadow detail. This will be more significant for higher speed films. Although it’s possible that a roll of 100 speed film would show less degradation, we strongly recommend against putting any unexposed or exposed but unprocessed film through a CT Scanner.

We reached out to the TSA to ask what options there might be to warn passengers. We originally asked if it would be possible to add signage at airports that utilize CT scanning technology. We are developing warning stickers that can be placed on your film. These will be available in a label format so they can be printed on your in-home or in-office printer. Just attach the label to the plastic bag as described in the TSA description below.

The TSA did tell us that all TSA screeners are trained to hand check roll and movie film as well as single-use cameras. Sheet film in boxes may require more diligence on the part of the photographer.

From the TSA:

Most x-ray machines used to screen carry-on bags should not damage undeveloped film under ASA\ISO 800. There are a limited number of screening checkpoints that use x-ray equipment that may damage undeveloped film. These airports will have signage in front of the x-ray stating that the x-ray may damage undeveloped film.

If you are traveling with the following types of film, please pack it in a clear plastic bag, remove it from your carry-on bag at the checkpoint, and ask for a hand inspection:

• Film with an ASA\ISO 800 or higher
• Highly sensitive x-ray or scientific films
• Film that is or will be underexposed
• Film that you intend to “push process”
• Sheet film
• Large format film
• Medical film
• Scientific film
• Motion picture film
• Professional grade film
• Film of any speed that is subjected to x-ray screening more than five times

In most cases, the x-ray equipment used for screening checked baggage will damage undeveloped film; therefore, please place undeveloped film in carry-on bags.

For more information on TSA use of CT technology, please:
https://www.tsa.gov/computed-tomography

These US airports currently use CT scanning technology:

Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport (ATL)
Baltimore-Washington International Airport (BWI)
Chicago O’Hare International Airport (ORD)
Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport (CVG)
Detroit Metropolitan Wayne County Airport (DTW)
Houston Hobby Airport (HOU)
Indianapolis International Airport (IND)
John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK)
Logan International Airport (BOS)
Los Angeles International Airport (LAX)
Miami International Airport (MIA)
Oakland International Airport (OAK)
Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport (PHX)
Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport (DCA)
St. Louis Lambert International Airport (STL)
Tampa International Airport (TPA)
Washington-Dulles International Airport (IAD)

Kodak Alaris warning: New hand luggage scanners ‘will damage unprocessed film’

Here’s an update from Tim Rudman.

Screen Shot 2020-02-16 at 1.36.09 PM.png

He’s referring to the image at the top of this post.

Film: Check. No Negatives: Check.

I found a stash of older 35mm color negative film in a box above the basement stair–a dozen rolls, mas o menos, some a little past the expiration date but not by much. I shot some of it around town and finished off the last few rolls in–yes, you guessed it–Buenos Aires. Took ’em all to the pharmacy. A week or so later I picked up prints and A CD–NO NEGATIVES! This may not be recent news, but it came as a shock to me. I suppose most folks never look at their negatives again once the prints are made, and the “free CD” more than compensates for the missing film.

PSA: Many Film Processing Services No Longer Return Your Original Film

Despite and still, here is a link to films in current manufacture (possibly [likely] incomplete: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_photographic_films#Bergger

We still don’t know what happens to the processed film. All the more reason to DIY.

Printing The Positive

Here is a fascinating relic from our Armed Forces.

#1. Crumple!

#2. Fix for 8-10 minutes, or for 15.

#3. The siphon washer keeps prints separated during washing!

#4. How many more arresting details can you find?

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Jane Jacobs Meets Brian Eno: Jerry’s Map

In the grand tradition of local daily papers reviewing art exhibitions in the last week of the show, we now recommend you take the Blue Line to Chicago Avenue sometime during the next five days to see Jerry’s Map at Intuit Gallery. https://www.art.org/directions-and-hours/

“Gretzinger paints and collages pieces of the map based on randomly-generated instructions drawn from a special deck of instruction cards. When an instruction card is drawn, a modification is made to the specified panel, depending on what card and instruction is drawn. The original panel is scanned and filed, and a new panel takes its place. Rules could call for the addition of a new panel, new painting or collaging on an existing panel, the creation of a new facility or feature, or even the addition of a “void”-a white space removing what is underneath that can only be stopped by a defense wall card.”

Jerry’s Map

 

 

Who’s Making Film In 2020?

Lots of folks! Likely, this list is incomplete (there must be others in China and India); even the statement that Fuji and Kodak are the only manufacturers of color film seems to be suspect. Despite and still, what an array, eh?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_photographic_films

Al Fresco Exhibit at a Football Club

Club Atletico Velez Sarsfield in Buenos Aires hosted an international cultural event in early December comprising more than 50 cyanotypes from workers in South and North America (and a few points beyond). The list of participants was so inclusive that chances are you know someone who exhibited.