Robert

The news of Robert Frank’s passing was like an avalanche for several days. It was difficult to know how to respond and not be redundant. Link to major obituaries? Naw. String out so many of the famous pictures? 1-800-IDONTTHINKSO.

Here’s our solution: post a number of lesser-known pictures.

As well: https://vimeo.com/158952929

Barbara Crane, 1928-2019

https://www.artic.edu/collection?artist_ids=Barbara%20Crane

 

Now, Joe Jachna

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One of his former students posted this on social media: “Joe Jachna passed away on March 14th. It’s difficult to express how important he was to so many of his students. One of the luckiest things that ever happened to me was casually registering for his Photography class. It changed my life. And I realize that he became a sort of North Star for me – his teaching and example guiding me through over 45 years as a photographer and teacher. He was a wonderful person, gentle, smart, calm, principled, funny, and kind. He completely separated his practice of photography from the pursuit of career success, concentrating on the search for intrinsic value in photographs and devoting himself to the joys and challenges of photographic exploration. He presented and exemplified a model for a sustained and principled life as a photographer. I’m still guided by things he told us. When my work is going poorly, I remember him saying encouraging things like “You have to take the bad photographs to get to the good photographs.” But his value as a teacher cannot be summarized by the many stories and comments that stick with me – it was more fundamental. Joe taught without ego or baggage. He arrived in each class displaying a true love of photography, and a conviction that photography was important. Perhaps even more crucial, he always looked for – and found – wonderful potential in his students and their work. Often, that gave us our first bursts of confidence as photographers. He took our work seriously, and that helped us take our work, and ourselves, seriously. I’m pretty certain that without his teaching and encouragement I would not be a photographer and teacher today. Joe was truly beloved. He made wonderful photographs. He was an extraordinary teacher. He had such a profound and positive effect on so many of us. I’ve so grateful to have known him. Rest in peace, Joe.”

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http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/chicagotribune/obituary.aspx?n=Joseph-David-Jachna&pid=179412454

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Volumes Bookcafe

After more than a year of wading through bureaucratic mire, Kimberly and Rebecca have opened a beautiful new space on Milwaukee Avenue. Hie thee thither!

Chicago’s New, Crowdfunded Bookstore is a Glimpse of the Future

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Artur Fischer, 1919-2016

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Father of the electronic flash! http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/09/business/international/artur-fischer-inventor-with-more-patents-than-edison-dies-at-96.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=second-column-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news&_r=1

Golden Silver Nuggets, from Lee Friedlander

…and from Richard Benson. Given the relative paucity of Friedlander’s statements, this is gold, Jerry, gold.

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Good Night, Elsa.

A “perverse combination of dime store photography and Renaissance portraiture.”

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http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/06/arts/design/with-film-supply-dwindling-a-photographer-known-for-huge-portraits-stares-at-retirement.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=wide-thumb&module=mini-moth&region=top-stories-below&WT.nav=top-stories-below&_r=0

Be sure to follow all of the links as well.

http://radioboston.wbur.org/2015/12/30/elsa-dorfman

Photographer Elsa Dorfman with her 20x24 Polaroid camera in her studio. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Photographer Elsa Dorfman with her 20×24 Polaroid camera in her studio. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)